CuriOdyssey in San Mateo, CA Shows Off Two New Raccoon Girls & New Exhibit

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CuriOdyssey, in San Mateo, California, is known for its collection of wildlife rescues. One of which is an elderly raccoon named Merlin. His brother passed four years ago so he’s been going it solo. At almost 14 years old, this geriatric loner will be the oldest living raccoon in captivity (on record) in March.

In the wild, raccoons generally live only two to three years so Merlin is quite the trooper. He does have some back problems and is kind of a grumpy old man, only warming up to his trainer. He has, however, been enjoying the newly remodeled exhibit which has tripled in size and now features a shallow running stream and grassy play areas. Merlin will soon have to learn to share though.

CuriOdyssey new raccoon exhibit and introduction of two new female raccoons. Also featuring 14-year-old Marlin.

CuriOdyssey Brings In The Girls

Yesterday, for the first time, new raccoons Tilly and Pebbles were introduced to their new outdoor home. The two girls were in quarantine for 90 days after their arrival from Wisconsin so it was a pretty significant event. With neither being able to live in the wild, they were brought to CuriOdyssey to thrive and educate. 

CuriOdyssey new raccoon exhibit and introduction of two new female raccoons. Also featuring 14-year-old Marlin.

Meet Tilly

Tilly, a three-year-old feisty digger, had been regularly fed by local neighbors and lost her fear of humans. She has a wide face and the more traditional gray-ish coloring.

CuriOdyssey new raccoon exhibit and introduction of two new female raccoons. Also featuring 14-year-old Marlin.

Meet Pebbles

Pebbles, nearly a year old, was taken in and raised by a family who found her by her deceased mother. You’ll know it’s her by her tan stripped tail and pointy nose.

CuriOdyssey new raccoon exhibit and introduction of two new female raccoons. Also featuring 14-year-old Marlin.

Why Raccoons?

When I told Frans that I was going to CuriOdyssey to check out their two new raccoons he said, “Why?” I must admit that seeing raccoons in the wild can be kind of intimidating with their sharp claws and penetrating glares. Plus, they are known to wreak a bit havoc on unsuspecting suburban households. Raccoons are just the victims of misconception and circumstantial survival.

  • As omnivores, they help keep the population of rats, mice, ravens, snails, etc. in check.
  • They are also smart, opportunistic, and adaptable so if you have some yummies left outside for the pets or in the garbage, it’s fair game!
  • Raccoons didn’t always live in sewers. They actually prefer to be up high but there aren’t enough trees anymore.

So, if you raccoon-proof your yards, close up open spaces, keep and feed the pets inside at night, and keep your distance you can learn to appreciate these fuzzy bandits. I have to say, they were pretty stinking cute running about, climbing, digging, and playing in the water.

The CuriOdyssey Raccoon Exhibit

All three raccoons will not be in the exhibit at the same time, at least not for a while. Marlin and the girls will switch off using the outdoor exhibit until it’s safe to acquaint them with one another. This can be a sensitive and long process but it’s vital for them to all play together nicely.

When will you be heading to CuriOdyssey to meet Pebbles and Tilly?

CuriOdyssey new raccoon exhibit and introduction of two new female raccoons. Also featuring 14-year-old Marlin.

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About Author

TerriAnn van Gosliga is the main writer at Cookies & Clogs and Driving Mamas. Born & raised in the SF Bay Area but loves to travel. She's been married to her best friend for 15 years, homeschools her 14-year-old daughter, and has an accident-prone lab mix dog.

23 Comments

  1. I wondered how the integration would go bringing in the new residents. I hope that flows smoothly for them and they all end up liking one another. 🙂

  2. So cute! We have our own little raccoon exhibit a lot of nights. We have a raccoon that comes up onto our back porch a couple of nights a week. I’m usually the only one still awake and love to sneak over to the window and watch him just a few feet away. 🙂

  3. Oh I love the racoon’s, much better seeing them in an exhibit then in the garbage like we use to see them in an apt complex I lived at years ago. I would never take it out at night because of them.

  4. I love raccoons. What neat place to visit. I once had a racoons on my doorstep, Dad told me I was crazy for trying to “shoo” it away because I guess they are not that friendly out in the wild 😉

  5. Raccoons are beautiful animals. So glad you covered this story and I will definitely take my kids to observe these brilliant creatures. Just hope we preserve our wild space for all animals, no matter our attitudes towards them.

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